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  • Nursing
  • Fast Facts

    Program Start Term: Fall

    Award: AAS

    Average Class Size: 36

    Program Length: 4 Semesters

    Part-Time or Full-Time: Full-Time

    Course Availability: Day Classes

    Program Locations: Pueblo, Fremont, Durango

    Download Program Guide

  • Career Information

    While the demand for high quality health care continues to grow, the shortage of registered nurses is projected to grow to 500,000 by 2025 ( http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education-resources/nrpbrochure.pdf).  Such a large shortage results in highly competitive salaries, benefits, and more. Another great benefit is the many nursing specialties that are available. For example, a nurse can become a labor and delivery nurse, flight nurse, home health nurse, ER nurse, ICU nurse, or psychiatric nurse etc.  The ADN program prepares you to provide safe, therapeutic, and competent nursing care in hospitals and other healthcare settings. You may also work as an entry level patient-care manager.  According to the bureau of labor statistics, the average nurse’s yearly income is $65,470. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291141.htm.

    What Will I Learn
    The ADN program teaches you skills of direct patient care that you can apply in any healthcare setting. It offers theoretical and applied instruction in classrooms, simulated laboratories, and clinical settings. It integrates education in adult, gerontological, obstetric, pediatric, and psychiatric-mental health nursing. Your clinical learning will take place in diverse types of institutions. Entry level courses in leadership teach you to direct and supervise ancillary personnel. The program allows a practical nursing exit point (certificate). After successfully completing the first two semesters of the program, students are eligible to write the Practical Nursing National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN). At this point, students could exit and seek employment as LPNs or continue on in the remaining two semesters and prepare to write the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). After completing all requirements, you will receive the AAS degree. Successful performance on the (NCLEX-RN) awards state licensure and qualifies you for the title of Registered Nurse (RN).

    Our Experienced Faculty
    Representing a number of qualified and highly experienced nurses, our faculty members are trained teachers providing quality education to students.  The diverse backgrounds of faculty members include specializations in obstetrics, pediatrics, critical care, mental health, and primary care.

    Our Cutting Edge Facilities
    The PCC nursing department offers an array of learning tools and cutting edge technology to enhance student experiences and overall education.  The program provides learning labs with numerous low and high fidelity mannequins and a new simulation center at St. Mary Corwin Hospital. These experiences allow students to practice in different real life scenarios. Collaborative relationships with local hospitals allow clinical experiences necessary to accomplish graduate competencies and to acquire “work ready” skills.

    Accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326; Telephone: 404.975.5000, www.nlnac.org. Approved by the Colorado State Board of Nursing.

    THC (marijuana) is part of the required 10-panel drug screen prior to admittance into any Health Professions or Public Safety program at PCC. The passage of Amendment 64 in the State of Colorado, does not overrule Federal law, which states this is still an illegal substance. Students testing positive for THC (marijuana) will not be allowed entrance or re-entrance into a Health or Public Safety program.

  • Spotlight

    Besides the opportunity to care for others, a degree in nursing will advance you into a career field that continues to grow despite nationwide economic turmoil.  According to Scrubs, "Healthcare facilities across the U.S., including hospitals, long-term care and clinics, added 21,000 jobs in November 2009. In that same month, 85,000 people in other fields lost their jobs."